Breaking LONDON Wembley

A man who kept dangerous drivers on the road has been jailed

 

Detectives from the Met’s Roads and Transport Policing Command [RTPC], in partnership with Transport for London, have brought an end to the illegal operation of a man who kept dangerous drivers on the road.

Hamid Alhendi, 46,  of Hendale Avenue, Barnet received a total of five years’ imprisonment for one count of perverting the course of justice and five counts of fraud at Harrow Crown Court, Tuesday, 30 March.

Sentence breakdown is:

1] Perverting the course of justice – 56 months imprisonment.
2] Fraudulently opening bank accounts in false names – six months’ imprisonment.
3] Fraudulently opening bank accounts in false names – six months’ imprisonment.
4] Fraudulently obtaining driving licenses which were then used to open bank accounts 12 months imprisonment.
5] Fraudulently obtaining driving licenses which were then used to open bank accounts 12 months imprisonment.
6] One count of fraud for providing a fake name to police when stopped for a traffic matter – four months imprisonment.

Sentences for offences 2-5 are to be served concurrently. The sentence for offence 6 is to be served consecutively).

Alhendi’s wife, Egle Slizauskaite, 38,  of the same address received seven months imprisonment, suspended for 12 months, with three months electronic monitoring for perverting the course of justice.

Both had pleaded guilty to their offences at the same court, on Tuesday, 16 February.

Alhendi and an associate masterminded the scam from 253A Ealing Avenue, Wembley from 2012 to 2018.

For a fee, the pair offered a service to help those caught by traffic cameras to evade prosecution and avoid fines and penalty points on their driving licence by falsifying the Notices of Prosecution. Offenders were usually local to Alhendi and were aware of the service through word-of-mouth.

The pair also used their scam to avoid prosecution for driving offences they had committed and on one occasion this involved Alhendi’s wife, Egle Slizauskaite.

By the end of the investigation police had identified at least 293 instances where Notices for Prosecution had been falsified.

Additionally, Alhendi used multiple false identities to fraudulently open accounts with banks, building societies and other service providers as part of the scams.

Police became aware of the scam when they identified a high volume of ‘Notices of intended prosecution’ [NIPs] pertaining to the address in Ealing Road, Wembley.

On 1 February 2018, the deception came to an end following a raid by detectives from the Met’s Roads and Transport Policing Command Proactive Crime Team on the business premises and home addresses connected with the defendants.

Among the evidence recovered were mobile phones containing images of the falsified NIPs

Alhendi’s associate and wife were arrested. However, Alhendi himself was in prison at that time for a separate offence. Alhendi and his wife were both charged as per the offences they pleaded guilty to.

The associate was charged with identification frauds and released under investigation for perverting the course of justice. During this time he fled the country but is still wanted for the offence.

Detective Constable Isabel Peres, RTPC Proactive Crime Team said: “I am very pleased with this outcome and that we have brought this illegal operation to an end.

“Alhendi’s fraudulent actions meant that motorists who committed dangerous driving offences went unpunished and unchecked. For the safety of all road users, we need to know who offending motorists are. By helping to keep dangerous drivers on the roads, Alhendi’s scam could have had serious consequences for other people walking and cycling and motorists.

“We will deal robustly with such people and look to bring to justice anyone who commits a criminal offence as this sentence shows.”